Archive for Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Every Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Main Theater.

September Theme: Audience Choice

September 06: Citizen Kane (1941, 119 min, PG)
Orson Welles first feature film — which he directed, produced, and co-wrote, as well as playing the title role — proved to be his most important and influential work, a ground-breaking drama loosely based on the life of William Randolph Hearst which is frequently cited as the finest American film ever made.

September 13: Casablanca (1942, 102 min, NR)
One of the most memorable of all film experiences, Casablanca is a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the production—story, cast, photography, direction, and music—are woven expertly together to create a motion picture monument. Wartime refugees gather in Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon. The final airport sequence is an event not to be forgotten.

September 20: High Noon (1952, 84 min)
Four Academy Awards, including Gary Cooper’s second Best Actor Oscar, went to director Fred Zinnemann’s landmark western drama. Cooper shines as retiring frontier marshal Will Kane, who must stand alone when a vengeance-seeking outlaw comes to town. Grace Kelly co-stars as Kane’s new Quaker wife.

September 27: Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967, 138 min, NR)
The “Roaring Twenties” live on in this Oscar-winning musical comedy of innocent girls, wild flappers, romance, and crime. Julie Andrews stars as Millie, whose plan to get a job with–and then marry–a wealthy businessman finds her crossing paths with a naive girl, a paper clip salesman, a ditzy widow, and a hotel house mother who sells her tenants into white slavery.

October Theme: Haunted Hollywood

October 04: Ghost Breakers (1940, 85 min, NR)
On the run after killing a mobster, radio crime show host (Bob Hope) wind up travelling with heiress (Paulette Goddard) to Cuba, where the pair encounters a haunted house, zombies, hidden treasures and the dead gangster’s twin brother.

October 11: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941, 93 min, NR)
Heavenly comedy classic stars Robert Montgomery as Joe Pendleton, an amiable boxer who arrives in Paradise 50 years before his time and is given a second shot at life by the angels. Sent back to Earth in the body of a wealthy─and recently murdered─playboy, Joe must get his new life straightened out while trying to resume his boxing career.

October 18: Canterville Ghost (1944, 95 min, NR)
Delightful blend of spooky comedy and wartime adventure, based on an Oscar Wilde story, stars Charles Laughton as the spectre doomed to haunt the family castle until he proves his courage. He gets his chance when he aids a squad of American soldiers billeted there.

October 25: The Uninvited (1944, 98 min, NR)
In this eerie ghost story with several memorable scares, Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey star as siblings who buy a house on England’s Cornish coast, only to find signs that the manor is haunted. Does a lovely local (Gail Russell) with psychic abilities hold the key to the ghost’s identity?

November Theme: Politics on the Silver Screen

November 01: Gabriel Over the White House (1933, 86 min, NR)
A remarkable satire of politics starring Walter Huston as an irresponsible president who sees a heavenly vision while recuperating from a serious auto accident. Soon, he changes his life and becomes a man of the people. But Huston’s newfound style is not appreciated by all, including his former cohort

November 08: The Best Man (1964, 102 min, NR)
Gore Vidal adapted his play of backroom politics for this compelling Washington drama. Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson star as contentious candidates competing for their party’s presidential nomination. However, their quest for the Oval Office becomes a real challenge when their principles and convictions are tested.

November 15: The Great McGinty (1940, 81 min, NR)
Preston Sturges’ directorial debut is this marvelously wicked comedy about a bum who joins a political machine and works his way into the governor’s office.

November 22: The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 126 min, PG-13)
An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, it was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962. John Frankenheimer’s blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire stars Laurence Harvey as a Korean War “hero” who has been brainwashed by the Soviets. Frank Sinatra is the war buddy who learns of the plot and must stop him.

November 29:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, 90 min, NR)
Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama about government and the American spirit stars Jimmy Stewart as Jefferson Smith, a small-town man selected to replace a deceased U.S. senator. Picked because it was believed he’d be easy to manipulate, Smith dedicates himself to doing some good but finds his honest and idealistic approach at odds with the corrupt political machine.

Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Every Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Main Theater.

September Theme: Audience Choice

September 06: Citizen Kane (1941, 119 min, PG)
Orson Welles first feature film — which he directed, produced, and co-wrote, as well as playing the title role — proved to be his most important and influential work, a ground-breaking drama loosely based on the life of William Randolph Hearst which is frequently cited as the finest American film ever made.

September 13: Casablanca (1942, 102 min, NR)
One of the most memorable of all film experiences, Casablanca is a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the production—story, cast, photography, direction, and music—are woven expertly together to create a motion picture monument. Wartime refugees gather in Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon. The final airport sequence is an event not to be forgotten.

September 20: High Noon (1952, 84 min)
Four Academy Awards, including Gary Cooper’s second Best Actor Oscar, went to director Fred Zinnemann’s landmark western drama. Cooper shines as retiring frontier marshal Will Kane, who must stand alone when a vengeance-seeking outlaw comes to town. Grace Kelly co-stars as Kane’s new Quaker wife.

September 27: Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967, 138 min, NR)
The “Roaring Twenties” live on in this Oscar-winning musical comedy of innocent girls, wild flappers, romance, and crime. Julie Andrews stars as Millie, whose plan to get a job with–and then marry–a wealthy businessman finds her crossing paths with a naive girl, a paper clip salesman, a ditzy widow, and a hotel house mother who sells her tenants into white slavery.

October Theme: Haunted Hollywood

October 04: Ghost Breakers (1940, 85 min, NR)
On the run after killing a mobster, radio crime show host (Bob Hope) wind up travelling with heiress (Paulette Goddard) to Cuba, where the pair encounters a haunted house, zombies, hidden treasures and the dead gangster’s twin brother.

October 11: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941, 93 min, NR)
Heavenly comedy classic stars Robert Montgomery as Joe Pendleton, an amiable boxer who arrives in Paradise 50 years before his time and is given a second shot at life by the angels. Sent back to Earth in the body of a wealthy─and recently murdered─playboy, Joe must get his new life straightened out while trying to resume his boxing career.

October 18: Canterville Ghost (1944, 95 min, NR)
Delightful blend of spooky comedy and wartime adventure, based on an Oscar Wilde story, stars Charles Laughton as the spectre doomed to haunt the family castle until he proves his courage. He gets his chance when he aids a squad of American soldiers billeted there.

October 25: The Uninvited (1944, 98 min, NR)
In this eerie ghost story with several memorable scares, Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey star as siblings who buy a house on England’s Cornish coast, only to find signs that the manor is haunted. Does a lovely local (Gail Russell) with psychic abilities hold the key to the ghost’s identity?

November Theme: Politics on the Silver Screen

November 01: Gabriel Over the White House (1933, 86 min, NR)
A remarkable satire of politics starring Walter Huston as an irresponsible president who sees a heavenly vision while recuperating from a serious auto accident. Soon, he changes his life and becomes a man of the people. But Huston’s newfound style is not appreciated by all, including his former cohort

November 08: The Best Man (1964, 102 min, NR)
Gore Vidal adapted his play of backroom politics for this compelling Washington drama. Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson star as contentious candidates competing for their party’s presidential nomination. However, their quest for the Oval Office becomes a real challenge when their principles and convictions are tested.

November 15: The Great McGinty (1940, 81 min, NR)
Preston Sturges’ directorial debut is this marvelously wicked comedy about a bum who joins a political machine and works his way into the governor’s office.

November 22: The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 126 min, PG-13)
An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, it was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962. John Frankenheimer’s blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire stars Laurence Harvey as a Korean War “hero” who has been brainwashed by the Soviets. Frank Sinatra is the war buddy who learns of the plot and must stop him.

November 29:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, 90 min, NR)
Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama about government and the American spirit stars Jimmy Stewart as Jefferson Smith, a small-town man selected to replace a deceased U.S. senator. Picked because it was believed he’d be easy to manipulate, Smith dedicates himself to doing some good but finds his honest and idealistic approach at odds with the corrupt political machine.

Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Every Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Main Theater.

September Theme: Audience Choice

September 06: Citizen Kane (1941, 119 min, PG)
Orson Welles first feature film — which he directed, produced, and co-wrote, as well as playing the title role — proved to be his most important and influential work, a ground-breaking drama loosely based on the life of William Randolph Hearst which is frequently cited as the finest American film ever made.

September 13: Casablanca (1942, 102 min, NR)
One of the most memorable of all film experiences, Casablanca is a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the production—story, cast, photography, direction, and music—are woven expertly together to create a motion picture monument. Wartime refugees gather in Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon. The final airport sequence is an event not to be forgotten.

September 20: High Noon (1952, 84 min)
Four Academy Awards, including Gary Cooper’s second Best Actor Oscar, went to director Fred Zinnemann’s landmark western drama. Cooper shines as retiring frontier marshal Will Kane, who must stand alone when a vengeance-seeking outlaw comes to town. Grace Kelly co-stars as Kane’s new Quaker wife.

September 27: Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967, 138 min, NR)
The “Roaring Twenties” live on in this Oscar-winning musical comedy of innocent girls, wild flappers, romance, and crime. Julie Andrews stars as Millie, whose plan to get a job with–and then marry–a wealthy businessman finds her crossing paths with a naive girl, a paper clip salesman, a ditzy widow, and a hotel house mother who sells her tenants into white slavery.

October Theme: Haunted Hollywood

October 04: Ghost Breakers (1940, 85 min, NR)
On the run after killing a mobster, radio crime show host (Bob Hope) wind up travelling with heiress (Paulette Goddard) to Cuba, where the pair encounters a haunted house, zombies, hidden treasures and the dead gangster’s twin brother.

October 11: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941, 93 min, NR)
Heavenly comedy classic stars Robert Montgomery as Joe Pendleton, an amiable boxer who arrives in Paradise 50 years before his time and is given a second shot at life by the angels. Sent back to Earth in the body of a wealthy─and recently murdered─playboy, Joe must get his new life straightened out while trying to resume his boxing career.

October 18: Canterville Ghost (1944, 95 min, NR)
Delightful blend of spooky comedy and wartime adventure, based on an Oscar Wilde story, stars Charles Laughton as the spectre doomed to haunt the family castle until he proves his courage. He gets his chance when he aids a squad of American soldiers billeted there.

October 25: The Uninvited (1944, 98 min, NR)
In this eerie ghost story with several memorable scares, Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey star as siblings who buy a house on England’s Cornish coast, only to find signs that the manor is haunted. Does a lovely local (Gail Russell) with psychic abilities hold the key to the ghost’s identity?

November Theme: Politics on the Silver Screen

November 01: Gabriel Over the White House (1933, 86 min, NR)
A remarkable satire of politics starring Walter Huston as an irresponsible president who sees a heavenly vision while recuperating from a serious auto accident. Soon, he changes his life and becomes a man of the people. But Huston’s newfound style is not appreciated by all, including his former cohort

November 08: The Best Man (1964, 102 min, NR)
Gore Vidal adapted his play of backroom politics for this compelling Washington drama. Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson star as contentious candidates competing for their party’s presidential nomination. However, their quest for the Oval Office becomes a real challenge when their principles and convictions are tested.

November 15: The Great McGinty (1940, 81 min, NR)
Preston Sturges’ directorial debut is this marvelously wicked comedy about a bum who joins a political machine and works his way into the governor’s office.

November 22: The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 126 min, PG-13)
An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, it was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962. John Frankenheimer’s blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire stars Laurence Harvey as a Korean War “hero” who has been brainwashed by the Soviets. Frank Sinatra is the war buddy who learns of the plot and must stop him.

November 29:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, 90 min, NR)
Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama about government and the American spirit stars Jimmy Stewart as Jefferson Smith, a small-town man selected to replace a deceased U.S. senator. Picked because it was believed he’d be easy to manipulate, Smith dedicates himself to doing some good but finds his honest and idealistic approach at odds with the corrupt political machine.

Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Every Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Main Theater.

September Theme: Audience Choice

September 06: Citizen Kane (1941, 119 min, PG)
Orson Welles first feature film — which he directed, produced, and co-wrote, as well as playing the title role — proved to be his most important and influential work, a ground-breaking drama loosely based on the life of William Randolph Hearst which is frequently cited as the finest American film ever made.

September 13: Casablanca (1942, 102 min, NR)
One of the most memorable of all film experiences, Casablanca is a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the production—story, cast, photography, direction, and music—are woven expertly together to create a motion picture monument. Wartime refugees gather in Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon. The final airport sequence is an event not to be forgotten.

September 20: High Noon (1952, 84 min)
Four Academy Awards, including Gary Cooper’s second Best Actor Oscar, went to director Fred Zinnemann’s landmark western drama. Cooper shines as retiring frontier marshal Will Kane, who must stand alone when a vengeance-seeking outlaw comes to town. Grace Kelly co-stars as Kane’s new Quaker wife.

September 27: Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967, 138 min, NR)
The “Roaring Twenties” live on in this Oscar-winning musical comedy of innocent girls, wild flappers, romance, and crime. Julie Andrews stars as Millie, whose plan to get a job with–and then marry–a wealthy businessman finds her crossing paths with a naive girl, a paper clip salesman, a ditzy widow, and a hotel house mother who sells her tenants into white slavery.

October Theme: Haunted Hollywood

October 04: Ghost Breakers (1940, 85 min, NR)
On the run after killing a mobster, radio crime show host (Bob Hope) wind up travelling with heiress (Paulette Goddard) to Cuba, where the pair encounters a haunted house, zombies, hidden treasures and the dead gangster’s twin brother.

October 11: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941, 93 min, NR)
Heavenly comedy classic stars Robert Montgomery as Joe Pendleton, an amiable boxer who arrives in Paradise 50 years before his time and is given a second shot at life by the angels. Sent back to Earth in the body of a wealthy─and recently murdered─playboy, Joe must get his new life straightened out while trying to resume his boxing career.

October 18: Canterville Ghost (1944, 95 min, NR)
Delightful blend of spooky comedy and wartime adventure, based on an Oscar Wilde story, stars Charles Laughton as the spectre doomed to haunt the family castle until he proves his courage. He gets his chance when he aids a squad of American soldiers billeted there.

October 25: The Uninvited (1944, 98 min, NR)
In this eerie ghost story with several memorable scares, Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey star as siblings who buy a house on England’s Cornish coast, only to find signs that the manor is haunted. Does a lovely local (Gail Russell) with psychic abilities hold the key to the ghost’s identity?

November Theme: Politics on the Silver Screen

November 01: Gabriel Over the White House (1933, 86 min, NR)
A remarkable satire of politics starring Walter Huston as an irresponsible president who sees a heavenly vision while recuperating from a serious auto accident. Soon, he changes his life and becomes a man of the people. But Huston’s newfound style is not appreciated by all, including his former cohort

November 08: The Best Man (1964, 102 min, NR)
Gore Vidal adapted his play of backroom politics for this compelling Washington drama. Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson star as contentious candidates competing for their party’s presidential nomination. However, their quest for the Oval Office becomes a real challenge when their principles and convictions are tested.

November 15: The Great McGinty (1940, 81 min, NR)
Preston Sturges’ directorial debut is this marvelously wicked comedy about a bum who joins a political machine and works his way into the governor’s office.

November 22: The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 126 min, PG-13)
An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, it was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962. John Frankenheimer’s blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire stars Laurence Harvey as a Korean War “hero” who has been brainwashed by the Soviets. Frank Sinatra is the war buddy who learns of the plot and must stop him.

November 29:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, 90 min, NR)
Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama about government and the American spirit stars Jimmy Stewart as Jefferson Smith, a small-town man selected to replace a deceased U.S. senator. Picked because it was believed he’d be easy to manipulate, Smith dedicates himself to doing some good but finds his honest and idealistic approach at odds with the corrupt political machine.

Tuesday Afternoon at the Bijou

Every Tuesday at 1 p.m. in the Main Theater.

September Theme: Audience Choice

September 06: Citizen Kane (1941, 119 min, PG)
Orson Welles first feature film — which he directed, produced, and co-wrote, as well as playing the title role — proved to be his most important and influential work, a ground-breaking drama loosely based on the life of William Randolph Hearst which is frequently cited as the finest American film ever made.

September 13: Casablanca (1942, 102 min, NR)
One of the most memorable of all film experiences, Casablanca is a true Hollywood legend. All the elements of the production—story, cast, photography, direction, and music—are woven expertly together to create a motion picture monument. Wartime refugees gather in Morocco to obtain scarce exit visas to Lisbon. The final airport sequence is an event not to be forgotten.

September 20: High Noon (1952, 84 min)
Four Academy Awards, including Gary Cooper’s second Best Actor Oscar, went to director Fred Zinnemann’s landmark western drama. Cooper shines as retiring frontier marshal Will Kane, who must stand alone when a vengeance-seeking outlaw comes to town. Grace Kelly co-stars as Kane’s new Quaker wife.

September 27: Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967, 138 min, NR)
The “Roaring Twenties” live on in this Oscar-winning musical comedy of innocent girls, wild flappers, romance, and crime. Julie Andrews stars as Millie, whose plan to get a job with–and then marry–a wealthy businessman finds her crossing paths with a naive girl, a paper clip salesman, a ditzy widow, and a hotel house mother who sells her tenants into white slavery.

October Theme: Haunted Hollywood

October 04: Ghost Breakers (1940, 85 min, NR)
On the run after killing a mobster, radio crime show host (Bob Hope) wind up travelling with heiress (Paulette Goddard) to Cuba, where the pair encounters a haunted house, zombies, hidden treasures and the dead gangster’s twin brother.

October 11: Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941, 93 min, NR)
Heavenly comedy classic stars Robert Montgomery as Joe Pendleton, an amiable boxer who arrives in Paradise 50 years before his time and is given a second shot at life by the angels. Sent back to Earth in the body of a wealthy─and recently murdered─playboy, Joe must get his new life straightened out while trying to resume his boxing career.

October 18: Canterville Ghost (1944, 95 min, NR)
Delightful blend of spooky comedy and wartime adventure, based on an Oscar Wilde story, stars Charles Laughton as the spectre doomed to haunt the family castle until he proves his courage. He gets his chance when he aids a squad of American soldiers billeted there.

October 25: The Uninvited (1944, 98 min, NR)
In this eerie ghost story with several memorable scares, Ray Milland and Ruth Hussey star as siblings who buy a house on England’s Cornish coast, only to find signs that the manor is haunted. Does a lovely local (Gail Russell) with psychic abilities hold the key to the ghost’s identity?

November Theme: Politics on the Silver Screen

November 01: Gabriel Over the White House (1933, 86 min, NR)
A remarkable satire of politics starring Walter Huston as an irresponsible president who sees a heavenly vision while recuperating from a serious auto accident. Soon, he changes his life and becomes a man of the people. But Huston’s newfound style is not appreciated by all, including his former cohort

November 08: The Best Man (1964, 102 min, NR)
Gore Vidal adapted his play of backroom politics for this compelling Washington drama. Henry Fonda and Cliff Robertson star as contentious candidates competing for their party’s presidential nomination. However, their quest for the Oval Office becomes a real challenge when their principles and convictions are tested.

November 15: The Great McGinty (1940, 81 min, NR)
Preston Sturges’ directorial debut is this marvelously wicked comedy about a bum who joins a political machine and works his way into the governor’s office.

November 22: The Manchurian Candidate (1962, 126 min, PG-13)
An unusually tense and intelligent political thriller, it was a film far ahead of its time. Its themes of thought control, political assassination, and multinational conspiracy were hardly common currency in 1962. John Frankenheimer’s blend of Cold War paranoia and sly satire stars Laurence Harvey as a Korean War “hero” who has been brainwashed by the Soviets. Frank Sinatra is the war buddy who learns of the plot and must stop him.

November 29:  Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939, 90 min, NR)
Frank Capra’s classic comedy-drama about government and the American spirit stars Jimmy Stewart as Jefferson Smith, a small-town man selected to replace a deceased U.S. senator. Picked because it was believed he’d be easy to manipulate, Smith dedicates himself to doing some good but finds his honest and idealistic approach at odds with the corrupt political machine.